Ignorance Ain’t Bliss

For your edification:

https://www.cbeinternational.org/resources/article/mutuality/tracking-errors-bible-translation#disqus_thread

“...In Christianity, many of us intuitively recognize a disturbing connection between the treatment of women and some difficult verses and words in the Bible. While some Christians rationalize sexism and patriarchy by appealing to the “plain reading” of Scripture, others instinctively question whether what they see on the pages of Scripture is a faithful and consistent translation of the original text...”

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Amen

“The Creation of God,” oil on linen.

The artist is Harmonia Rosales, a Chicago-based Afro-Cuban painter. This work was created in 2017.

Worth Repeating

The following quote (some versions longer) has been going around the Internet and may be worth repeating. It was seen on Gloria Steinem’s Facebook page. Steinem says she’s not the author but is grateful to whomever is. While it’s not the parallel it purports to be, it does provoke much thought:

“I want young men who buy a gun to be treated like young women who seek an abortion: a mandatory 48-hours waiting period, written permission from a parent or a judge, a note from a doctor proving that he understands what he is about to do, time spent watching a video on individual and mass murders, traveling hundreds of miles at his own expense to the nearest gun shop, and walking through protestors holding photos of loved ones killed by guns, protestors who call him a murderer.” 

Suggested Reading

Here’s a review by a fellow blogger of a book suggestion appropriate for our times:

Discovering My Complicity in Denying Asylum

Be inspired! Enjoy!

from

The Anima Series

Click on the title below, and be inspired! Enjoy!

“Who is worthy to be used by God?”

From a Sierra Leone War Orphan to the Life of a Professional Ballerina

Michaela DePrince became the youngest principal dancer for the Dance Theatre of Harlem and also joined the Dutch National Ballet. Born in war-torn Sierra Leone, her story (told by her (here) on TED) is one of triumph over unbelievable tragedy.

Please click here to purchase Michaela’s book.

Speaking of Women’s History…

Yes, we need to celebrate women and lift up their historic struggles. But we must not do that without looking squarely in the face of the whole historicity of all the struggles of all women in America.

So, while celebrating women’s suffrage and the history of that fight for the vote which was finally obtained in 1920, let’s please note that it was White women who got the vote, not All women.

Native American women weren’t allowed to be citizens until 1924.

African Americans (men and women) fought to get the vote well into the middle of the century. In fact, the fight continues here, now, where people of color are concentrated.

As Dr. Laura Morgan Roberts, professor of management at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, pointed out in a recent Harvard Business Review, women of color at work represent only 4% of the highest ranking positions, despite their training, degrees, experience, and ability to perform. (Click here to read that article.)

Let’s observe victories, keep the truth before us, and work hard to accomplish even more. We’re in this together.